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      ARTHRITIS

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ARTHRITIS. T'ai Chi's low impact causes no joint damage (unlike other higher impact exercises), while its weight-bearing aspect may encourage development of bone mass and connective tissue. WTCQD Note: Those with arthritic knees may want to do modified Tai Chi forms sharing weight on both legs rather than fully centering the weight over one knee.


Harvard Health Publications

Arthritis. In a 40-person study at Tufts University, presented in October 2008 at a meeting of the American College of Rheumatology, an hour of tai chi twice a week for 12 weeks reduced pain and improved mood and physical functioning more than standard stretching exercises in people with severe knee osteoarthritis. According to a Korean study published in December 2008 in Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, eight weeks of tai chi classes followed by eight weeks of home practice significantly improved flexibility and slowed the disease process in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, a painful and debilitating inflammatory form of arthritis that affects the spine.
Read more at Harvard Health Publications ...



In controlled experiments, glucosomine and shark cartilage have failed to reliably relieve knee pain, but a 2011 review of multiple studies of Tai Chi ... concluded that it is generally effective at controlling pain and improving physical function.

-- Parade Magazine (the world's #1 most
   read magazine), January 27, 2013


Study finds decrease in pain and fatigue among individuals with rheumatoid arthritis after 12 weeks of tai chi.
-- Daejeon University in Korea
Read entire article ...


Mind-body. You can soothe achy joints and improve mobility with mind-body techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation, yoga, meditation, tai chi and guided imagery. A recent study from Korea found that tai chi is significantly beneficial for controlling pain and improving physical function in people who have osteoarthritis in the knee. For details about various options, consult the Arthritis Foundation's guide to alternative and natural therapies.

Read entire iVillage article ...

-- iVillage, June, 2012 - Beyond Aspirin: How to Ease Pain When You Have Arthritis



Most alternative treatments have either not been scientifically tested or subjected to limited investigations, says Arthritis Research UK.

Of 25 therapies, only a handful were judged to have enough medical evidence to support their use.

These included acupuncture, massage, tai chi and yoga ...

Very little evidence was found in support of commonly-used therapies such as copper bracelets and magnetic therapy for arthritis, fibromyalgia or lower back pain.

For their analysis the researchers searched for randomised controlled trials - comparing the given therapy with a placebo, usual care or another treatment - that had been written up in English and published before the end of May 2011.

-- BBC News Online, Health Editor, Jan. 8, 2013

Read entire article ...




Osteoarthritis:

Twelve studies were included in the study, with 5 randomized controlled clinical trials and 7 nonrandomized controlled clinical trials dating up to June 2007. The review showed promising evidence in support of using Tai Chi to reduce pain associated with osteoarthritis and even reported larger effect sizes in pain reduction from Tai Chi than from other popular interventions, such as using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
- Medscape Today, from WebMD, 10/26/2010

Read entire article at:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/729132



Rheumatoid Arthritis:

The review mainly showed that Tai Chi statistically improved ankle plantar flexion in those with RA, but most other measures such as activities of daily living and swollen joints showed no improvements after Tai Chi interventions. None of the studies indicated any harmful effects of Tai Chi practice, and the review reported that adherence rates in the Tai Chi interventions were higher than in the controls, indicating that subjects may enjoy participating in Tai Chi over other exercises. - Medscape Today, from WebMD, 10/26/2010

Read entire article at:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/729132



Older people with knee pain may get help from tai chi

Knee pain from osteoarthritis is a common and often chronic ailment for older people. But a new study finds that practicing tai chi exercises may not only reduce osteoarthritis pain, but improve function as well.

-- Los Angeles Times, Oct. 30, 2009

Read entire article here. or related articles below:

Science Daily

CBC Canada

UK Guardian

US News & World Report

UK Telegraph

Private Healthcare UK

Irish Health


Arthritis. In a 40-person study at Tufts University, presented in October 2008 at a meeting of the American College of Rheumatology, an hour of tai chi twice a week for 12 weeks reduced pain and improved mood and physical functioning more than standard stretching exercises in people with severe knee osteoarthritis. According to a Korean study published in December 2008 in Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, eight weeks of tai chi classes followed by eight weeks of home practice significantly improved flexibility and slowed the disease process in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, a painful and debilitating inflammatory form of arthritis that affects the spine.

Harvard Medical School's Health Publications, May, 2009


Read more articles at Tai Chi Research:

Systematic review finds Tai Chi reduces pain in adults with lower limb osteoarthritis
Read entire article ...

Pilot study finds suggests tai chi benefits individuals with rheumatoid arthritis.
Read entire article ...

Tai chi benefits individuals with Ankylosing Spondylitis

Tai chi is effective in treating knee osteoarthritis


Harvard Medical School Releases Historic
Tai Chi Medical Research Lecture to Commemorate
World Tai Chi & Qigong Day!

The new Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi is a powerful reference book for all tai chi and qigong advocates, teachers, etc., and the guide cites WorldTaiChiDay.org's expansion of global awareness of tai chi and qigong!


VIDEO - How Tai Chi and Chi Kung Help Heal or Prevent Illness

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Check for World Tai Chi & Qigong Day articles on various health conditions and Tai Chi & Qigong (Chi Kung) Therapy, that you may publish on your publication or website, by clicking here.

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Tai Chi 'can cure arthritis'

New York (PTI): Suffering from arthritis? Try Tai Chi, a form of exercise which is regularly practiced in China, for a study says that it can reduce chronic pains.

An international team has found carried out the study and found that Tai Chi helps in mitigating the pain associated with problems like arthritis and lessen disability — in fact, it reduces pain with trends towards improving overall health...

"The fact that Tai Chi is inexpensive, convenient and enjoyable and conveys other psychological and social benefits supports the use this type of intervention for pain conditions such as arthritis," lead researcher Amanda Hall.

Hall of George Institute in Australia and colleagues have based their findings on an analysis of systematic review and meta-analysis, the results of which are published in the latest edition of the Arthritis Care & Research journal.

The Hindu News Update Service

Read more at:
http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/099200906121111.htm


Newswise - Tai chi is effective in the treatment of pain and physical impairment in people with severe knee osteoarthritis, according to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 22-Oct-2008


Mean comparisons of the change scores revealed that the experimental group perceived significantly less pain in their joints and reported fewer perceived difficulties in physical functioning, while the control group showed no change or even deterioration in physical functioning after 12 weeks. In the physical fitness test, there were significant improvements in balance and abdominal muscle strength for the tai chi exercise group.

-- Journal of Rheumatology, 30, 2039-44


Tai chi helps cut pain
of knee arthritis: study

(Reuters; October 26, 2008) - The traditional Chinese form of exercise known as tai chi can help reduce pain and physical impairment in people who have knee arthritis, researchers said on Saturday.

In their study, one group of people in their 60s with severe knee osteoarthritis performed tai chi for an hour twice a week for 12 weeks while a similar group did the same amount of conventional stretching exercises over the same period.

Those who did tai chi experienced greater pain reduction, less depression and improvements in physical function and overall health, researchers led by Dr. Chenchen Wang of Tufts Medical Center in Boston reported at a meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in San Francisco.

(Reporting by Will Dunham; Editing by Julie Steenhuysen and Peter Cooney)
. . . read entire article at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSTRE49P0VB20081026


Click for PEER REVIEWED RESEARCH ON T'AI CHI AND ARTHRITIS . . .


* NOTE: World Tai Chi & Qigong Day advises consulting your physician before beginning any new exercise, herbal, diet, or health program. The research listed here is meant to stimulate a discussion between you and your physician, health insurance carrier, etc., not as medical advise. Research and comments provided here are hoped to stimulate a more robust discussion of powerful natural mind/body health tools.
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BELOW IS PEER REVIEWED RESEARCH ON T'AI CHI AND ARTHRITIS:

1. Kirsteins, A.E., Dietz, F., & Hwang, S.M. (1991). Evaluating the safety and potential use of a weight-bearing exercise, Tai-Chi Chuan, for rheumatoid arthritis patients. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 70(3), 136-141.

2. Hartman, C.A., Manos, T.M., Winter, C., Hartman, D.M., Li, B., & Smith, J.C. (2000). Effects of T'ai Chi training on function and quality of life indicators in older adults with osteoarthritis. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 48(12):1553-9, 2000 Dec, 48(39 ref), 1553-1559.

3. Van Deusen, J., & Harlowe, D. (1987). The efficacy of the ROM Dance Program for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 41(2), 90-95.

4. Hartman, C.A. (US). Effects of T'ai Chi training on function and quality of life indicators in older adults with osteoarthritis. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 48(12), Dec-1559


NON-RESEARCH ARTICLES ON T'AI CHI AND ARTHRITIS:

1. Anonymous. (2002). Tai Chi may help OA patients. Orthopedics Today, 22(3):30, 2002 Mar, 22(3), 30

2. Anonymous. Tai chi for elders with chronic arthritis pain. Geriatric Nursing, 22(3):121, 2001 May-Jun, 22(3), 121-Jun

3. Cotter, A.C., Camardese, M.B., & Rigassio, D. (2001). Complementary and alternative medicine approaches to pain management in osteoarthritis. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation: State of the Art Reviews, 15(1):157-74, 2001 Feb, 15(99 ref), 157-174.

4. Galantino, M.L.A. (Univ Microfilms International). Blending traditional and alternative strategies for rehabilitation: Measuring functional outcomes and quality of life issues in an AIDS population. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: the Sciences & Engineering, 58 (6-B), Univ

5. Horstman, J. (2000). Explorations. Tai chi. Arthritis Today, 14(4):60-2, 2000 Jul-Aug, 14(4), 60-62.

6. Lumsden, D.B., Baccala, A., & Martire, J. (1998). T'ai chi for osteoarthritis: an introduction for primary care physicians. Geriatrics, 53(2):84, 87-8, 1998 Feb, 53(8 ref), 84-88.


7. Yocum, D.E., Castro, W.L., & Cornett, M. (2000). Exercise, education, and behavioral modification as alternative therapy for pain and stress in rheumatic disease. Rheum Dis Clin North Am JID - 8708093, 26(1), 145-1xi.

8. Anonymous. (1994). Medication in motion: tai chi and beyond. University of California Berkeley Wellness Letter, 10(5):7, 1994 Feb, 10(5), 7



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