Sun Style Tai Chi - (information)


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Sun Style Grand Master Photo with World Tai Chi & Qigong Day co-founders

World Tai Chi & Qigong Day's co-founders with the Grand Master of the Sun Style at the International Tai Chi Symposium

The Sun Style was developed by Sun Lu-t'ang, who was an expert in both Hsing-i Ch'uan (Xingyiquan) and Pa Kua Chang (Baguazhang) internal martial arts styles before he studied T'ai Chi. He was also a Neo-Confucian and Taoist scholar.



The below Sun Style research was generously provided by:
www.taichiproductions.com/articles/display.php?articleid=3

Sun style is the youngest of the major styles, it was created by Sun Lu-tang (1861-1932) whose daughter Sun Jian-yun is still living in Beijing. Sun was a well-known exponent of the Xingyiquan and Baguaquan (two famous internal martial art styles) before he learnt Tai Chi. In 1912 Sun happened to run into Hoa Weizheng (see Hoa style) who was sick. Without knowing who Hoa was, Sun kindly took care of Hao by finding him a hotel to rest a good doctor to treat him. After Hoa recovered from his illness he stayed in Sun's house and taught him Tai Chi.

It was said that Sun had only spent a relatively short period of time learning it and had subsequently incorporated his expertise of Xingyiquan and Baguaquan to create his own style.

Sun Style is characterised by agile steps. Whenever one foot moves forward or backwards the other foot follows. Its movements flow smoothly like water or cloud. Whenever you turn there is an opening and closing movement, which is a powerful Qigong exercise. Sun Style has a high stance.

The good points of Sun style are that it contains much Qigong, which is effective for relaxation and healing. The higher stance makes it more suitable for older people to learn. It is characterised by moving frequently or more mobility, making it especially suitable for people with arthritis.


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ORGANIZATIONS (NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL)
REPRESENTING MANY SCHOOLS OF THIS STYLE
- INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL LINKS FOLLOW

WEBSITE LOGOS
WEBSITE URLs
FORMS OF SUN STYLE TAUGHT:
(i.e. Long Form, Short Form, Sword, Fan, etc.)
http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/suntaichi Sun Style Taijiquan Association - UK

ORGANIZATIONS (NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL)
REPRESENTING MANY SCHOOLS OF THIS STYLE

- INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL LINKS FOLLOW

Sun Style Tai Chi - (General Links)

SCHOOL LINKS OF THIS STYLE

Sun Style Tai Chi - (General Links)


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Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Pain, Balance, Muscle Strength, and Perceived Difficulties in Physical Functioning in Older Women with Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

RHAYUN SONG, EUN-OK LEE, PAUL LAM, and SANG-CHEOL BAE

ABSTRACT.

Objective. Twelve forms of Sun-style tai chi exercise have been developed specifically to reduce the symptoms and improve the physical functioning of arthritic patients, and this randomized study examined the changes in symptoms and physical characteristics in older women with osteoarthritis (OA) at the completion of a 12-week tai chi exercise program.

Methods. Seventy-two patients with OA were randomly assigned into 2 groups. Due to a 41% overall dropout rate, 22 experimental subjects and 21 controls completed pre- and post-test measures over a 12 week interval. Outcome variables were physical symptoms and fitness, body mass index, cardiovascular functioning, and perceived difficulties in physical functioning. The independent t test was used to examine group differences.

Results. The homogeneity test confirmed that there were no significant group differences in demographic data and pretest measures. Mean comparisons of the change scores revealed that the experimental group perceived significantly less pain (t = –2.19, p = 0.034) and stiffness (t = –2.13, p = 0.039) in their joints, and reported fewer perceived difficulties in physical functioning (t = –2.81, p = 0.008), while the control group showed no change or even deterioration in physical functioning after 12 weeks. In the physical fitness test, there were significant improvements in balance (t = 3.34, p = 0.002) and abdominal muscle strength (t = 2.74, p = 0.009) for the tai chi exercise group. No significant group differences were found in flexibility and upper-body or knee muscle strength in the post-test scores.

Conclusion. Older women with OA were able to safely perform the 12 forms of Sun-style tai chi exercise for 12 weeks, and this was effective in improving their arthritic symptoms, balance, and physical functioning. A longitudinal study with a larger sample size is now needed to confirm the potential use of tai chi exercise in arthritis management. (J Rheumatol 2003;30:2039-44)

Key Indexing Terms:

TAI CHI EXERCISE

PHYSICAL FITNESS

OSTEOARTHRITIS

WOMEN

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the Department of Nursing, Soonchunhyang University, Chon An; College of Nursing, Seoul National University; and Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, The Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.

Supported by the Korea Research Foundation (Grant no. 2000-042-F00100), Seoul, Korea.

R. Song, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, Soonchunhyang University; E-O. Lee, RN, DNS, Professor, College of Nursing, Seoul National University; P. Lam, MD, Family Physician, Tai Chi Instructor, Conjoint Lecturer, University of New South Wales, Australia; S-C. Bae, MD, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, The Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Hanyang University Medical.

Address reprint requests to Dr. S-C. Bae, The Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul 133-792, South Korea. E-mail: scbae@hanyang.ac.kr

Submitted April 12, 2002; revision accepted February 13, 2003.

Learn more at:

http://www.jrheum.com/abstracts/abstracts03/2039.html

and at: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/sun1.htm

Sun Style Medical Research

The below Medical Research on Sun Style Tai Chi was generously provided by:
www.taichiproductions.com/articles/display.php?articleid=57

A Published Study: Tai Chi for Arthritis

By: Rhayun Song, Eun-Ok Lee, Paul Lam, Sang-Cheol Ba

Published in the September 2003 issue of "The Journal of Rheumatology." (Abstract available online)

Title:

Effects of tai chi exercise on pain, balance, muscle strength, and physical functioning in older women with osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical trial

Authors:

Rhayun Song, Eun-Ok Lee, Paul Lam, Sang-Cheol Bae

Objective:

Twelve forms of Sun-style tai chi exercise have been developed specifically to reduce the pain and stiffness, and improve quality of life for people with arthritis. This randomized study examined the changes in pain, stiffness and physical functions (ability to do daily tasks) in older women with osteoarthritis (OA) at the completion of a 12-week tai chi exercise program.

Methods:

72 patients with OA were randomly assigned into 2 groups. 22 experimental subjects and 21 controls completed pre- and post-test measures over a 12-week interval. Outcome measurements were physical symptoms and fitness, body mass index, cardiovascular functioning, and perceived difficulties in physical functioning. The independent t test was used to examine group differences.

Results:

Compared to the control group the tai chi group had 35% less pain, 29% less stiffness, 29% more ability to perform daily tasks (like climbing stairs), as well as improved abdominal muscles and better balance. No significant group differences were found in flexibility and upper-body or knee muscle strength in the post-test scores.

Conclusion:

Older women with OA were able to safely perform the 12 forms of Sun-style tai chi exercise for 12 weeks, and this was effective in improving their symptoms, balance, and physical functioning.

Author affiliations:

Rhayun Song, RN, PhD, Associate professor, Soonchunhyang University, South Korea

Eun-Ok Lee, RN, DNS, Professor, Seoul National University, South Korea

Paul Lam, MD, Family physician, Tai Chi teacher, and conjoint lecturer, University of NSW, Australia

Sang-Cheol Bae, MD, PhD, MPH, Associate professor, The Hospital for Rheumatic Disease, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea

Grant supporter: Supported by the Korea Research Foundation (Grant no. 2000-042-F00100), Seoul, Korea.

Address reprint requests to: Dr. S-C. Bae, The Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul 133-792, South Korea. E-mail: scbae@hanyang.ac.kr